Are Sales Slipping Through Your Fingers? Close the Deal with Logical Benefits

Are Sales Slipping Through Your Fingers? Close the Deal with Logical Benefits

Reader Comments (25)

  1. Great, great break-down. Providing logical benefits, helps in what I call the “unsupervised thinking time” of your audience when they have landed on the sales/landing page. You want to direct their thinking, while connecting with the reasons they would purchase or seek further. Super post!

    Maria Reyes-McDavis

  2. LOL, Janice, my first draft of this actually said “unless you’re buying Manolos.”

    There are a few logical benefits used to sell high-end luxury consumer goods–typically around quality of construction. But there are definitely some products (iPods, Manolos, music, jewelry, junk food, etc.) that customers need little or no logical justification to buy. They want them, and that is enough.

  3. Chuckling…great minds…

    Wasn’t there a whole ad campaign based on “because I am worth it. ” L’Oreal , I think.

    I like your suggestion of reinforcing logic after the sale as well. We love to feel we got something nifty.

  4. Wasn’t there a whole ad campaign based on “because I am worth it. ? L’Oreal , I think.

    I like your suggestion of reinforcing logic after the sale as well. We love to feel we got something nifty.

  5. Logical benefits may serve not so much to support the emotional reason to buy as to justify it: I know that junk food is disastrous for health but can’t resist it and seek some rational points (e.g. a low price & fast service) as self-justification. (Actually, things aren’t so bad: my chips addiction is almost overcome now).

  6. To provide a different context to Sonia’s excellent presentation think about how a direct mail package works. Each element has a primary communication objective. The outer envelope is the first impression / invitation, the brochure provides the emotional presentation and the letter presents the logical argument. Finally, the response device reinforces the benefits (emotional and logical) to reassures the consumer, punches the offer and provides all the info they need to take action.

  7. Often people need to justify their purchases to others besides themselves. You can’t tell your wife or your boss that you just can’t resist the bling. Logical benefits are stored in memory to use in self-defense.

  8. @Michael- LOL. FLowers work too. 🙂

    @ James- I like that context. It’s a very physical, tangible reminder of form and functions that convert to action.

    Bookmarking this one Sonia.

  9. @Helen, a little justification is a beautiful thing, isn’t it?

    @James, I love it. And all of those pieces can be used in an online context just as effectively. That’s one of the things I love about autoresponders–I can present the pieces sequentially without overwhelming the reader. I think part of why people hate long form sales pages is they’re too damned LONG. But the prospect still needs us to hit all of those points to make their decision.

    @Michael Martine, absolutely. Believe me, I had those logical benefits lined up when I pitched my boss on sending me to SOBCon.

    I’m honored, @Janice, thank you.

  10. An amazing post. Sales copy is one of the hardest things to learn for most people… I guess after hundreds of sales letters I might be popping out amazing pitches.

    I have been writing my 4th sales copy for the past 2 months – still not feeling it. This post just refreshed some stuff in my head 😉

  11. Alexander, I find that I know stuff but I keep re-getting it. I’ll implement an idea and then in a project down the line I see how I can *really* implement it. “The basics” are easy to pick up but it takes a long time to really implement them on a deep level.

  12. Excellent point about testimonials. I have been thinking a lot about how to incorporate them lately. I am finding that they are important – even on a resume!

  13. The only thing I would add is that I don’t think that stated logical benefits are often separated from the emotional appeal.

    I read an excellent quote on another blog that states,
    “When buyers buy, it isn’t because their objections have been met, or they have been persuaded by rational arguments. It’s because they’ve gotten comfortable with the decision . . . [A prospect’s] need is not to make a rational decision–their need is to feel comfortable with a rational decision they have to make.”

    Logical benefits are not appeals to “logic”–they are an emotional appeal to the buyer’s sense of receiving value. It’s about the comfort level of the prospect.

This article's comments are closed.